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Poetry by QuiEstInLiteris




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February 1, 2013
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Amabo te, dic te odisse me by Canis44 Amabo te, dic te odisse me by Canis44
You are welcome to quote me if you give me credit for the work, meaning citing properly. No stealing my work please.

I thought that it would be best just to upload this piece as a PDF. I needed a picture for the preview so I used a picture of an artificially colored rose. I found the
picture on wikipedia [link], it is free to use.

The poem itself is my attempt to experiment with language, and to addresses certain aspects of love.

The piece was greatly inspired by Robert Browning, Dante Alighieri, T.S. Eliot, Book IV of the Aeneid and Charlotte Perkins Gilman.
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:iconzephyrmaximum:
I like how you used two languages in this poem. However, I do agree with TundraFaux. Are your verbs conjugated correctly? Otherwise, I liked the concept and idea of the poem. It was raw and true, which is the best kind of poem.

Because this poem was so... as I stated before, raw, I had to read it a few times over. Not because it was bad, but because it was so good. Even then, you have to read it a few times to truly understand the meaning. I mean, no-one will ever understand it as much as you, seeing as you are the writer, but I feel like this is a poem someone can really connect with.

Keep up the awesome writing.

~Fly ön~ ZëphyrMäxïmüm
Recycle one bottle and make the Earth a better place.
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The Artist thought this was FAIR
2 out of 2 deviants thought this was fair.

:iconcelestialmemories:
What I would first like to say is, Wow! You wrote such a spectacular piece and it was very engaging--especially for people who are familiar with the references you are making with the piece. You use your very large and eloquent vocabulary that really enhances all of these different parts of love. I also like how you take the different and conflicting parts of love. While there is uneasiness and sweetness, there is also almost an unhealthy type of sensation (I got that by the references of hexes and Dido, of course).

The reason I gave the technique lower than the rest is due to the use of the different languages. I studied Latin so I was able to get them, but I feel like they were very important to feel the overall effect that you intended to write and for people who don't know they can be overlooked and ignored. Maybe offering some translations in the author's notes can help (not a lot of people would go out and look online to try to figure them out). And I would hate for people to bypass such lovely lines because they didn't learn Latin. It is just a suggestion.

Beautiful job as always!
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1 out of 1 deviants thought this was fair.

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:icontundrafaux:
TundraFaux Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2013
My only comment is this: are your verbs conjugated correctly to mean what you want? Do check that.
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:iconcanis44:
Canis44 Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2013  Student Writer
Could you perhaps point out the lines in Latin, and in Italian that you think are incorrect?
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:icontundrafaux:
TundraFaux Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2013
Mainly the title. And if you are using Italian as well then perhaps I am wrong altogether as I only know Latin. Well, that is disarming.
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:iconcanis44:
Canis44 Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2013  Student Writer
The title is written with 'Amabo te' for a reason; in classical Latin it is a phrase meaning 'please'(I plead you), or 'I love you'.
It is sometimes translated as 'I pray', but I was taught the normal use of the phrase. The line should translate as "Please, tell me you hate me" or "I love you, tell me you hate me." For the verb hate, well, 'te odis me' might work better,or simply 'odis me'. Hate is a strange verb in Latin, because it
is a defective verb.
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